Connection in Isolation, by Shara Turner, LPC, MSC, NCC, Eagala

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic human connection can be difficult.  Any one suffering from anxiety and depression can see symptoms rise exponentially due to the stress of isolation, possible job loss, fears of the future, and overall concern for one’s health or that of their loved ones. Prior to the present crisis resources were readily available to assist those in need. Today those resources can feel scarce and often times impersonal.

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Politics for Recovery , by Shara Turner, LPC, MSC, NCC, Eagala

These days a person cannot open social media or turn on the news without being bombarded by the rhetoric of the upcoming election. For many who live somewhere in the middle it can be a frustrating and confusing time. Despite one’s view point, when emotions are high and political polarization intense, keeping the course in recovery can be challenging. Even the smallest disagreement can turn into an emotionally charged argument and disrupt one’s place of peace while navigating sobriety.  It has been mentioned many times that during the early stages of recovery, being mindful of and minimizing exposure to triggers is encouraged.

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Overcoming Adversity, by Shara Turner, LPC, MSC, NCC, Eagala

Overcoming Adversity by Shara Turner, LPC, MSC, NCC, Eagala Over this past week we were bombarded by images of an American icon doting over his beautiful daughter. Although I did not know them, each time I glance at those pictures I feel a pang of sadness in my heart as I imagine the grief one mother and wife must be enduring. Unfortunately tragedy happens every day, in every country, city, and neighborhood around the world, and images like these are another reminder of how precious and fragile life really is. When I was 17 I lost my best friend, my father to a tragic accident. 28 years later I watched my own children mourn the loss of their father, best friend, and mentor.

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Neurobiology of Childhood Trauma – Lifelong Impact, by Dr. Drew W. Edwards.

Early life trauma can stem from physical, emotional or sexual abuse, neglect, loss of a loved one, bullying, witnessing violence, or from involvement in a serious accident, injury, natural disaster, terrorism or war. It can also result from growing up in a chronically dysfunctional home, where emotional neglect and indifference are the norm, and healthy attachments are never formed...and this is just the short list. The list of acute responses to a traumatic event are long and often last into adulthood, creating a set-up for a life that is emotionally painful and difficult for the victim to achieve full potential: Irritability hostility Depressive Symptoms Mood Swings, emotional instability Anxiety (e.g., panic attacks, specific phobia, generalized anxiety) Fear or traumatic reoccurrence Grief reaction Shame Feeling vulnerable and fragile Emotional detachment, unwilling to engage in discussion regarding emotions Crying Peritraumatic Disassociation: A form of psychological escape during or just after the event. Adjustment Reaction Disorder (clinically significant depressive symptoms and/or intrusive anxiety symptoms in the wake of a distressing event. Symptoms usually resolve within 6 months. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder The life trajectory of chronically traumatized persons will veer from the hopes and dreams they once possessed, as their life becomes increasingly and pathologically organized around the event(s), the aggressor(s) or alleviating the emotional pain that lingers like a frightening shadow. Effects on Neurodevelopment The fact that traumatic life experiences are predictive of mental illness and substance abuse is not surprising. What is surprising is the extent of neuroadaptive changes in the brains of traumatized children and teens. Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) Research Two recent studies showed that experiencing childhood trauma is common among people undergoing addiction treatment as adults.

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Clearing Up the Common Myths About Mental Health

Clearing Up the Common Myths About Mental Health The understanding of mental health issues is ever changing and evolving in different societies and cultures throughout the world. Although there has never been more increased awareness and available resources, there are still a lot of myths about mental health – perhaps because of the intractable stigmas around the subject. Common myths about mental health and treatment for mental health remain stubbornly embedded. Studies from the World Health Organization show that up to 1 out of 4 people will experience some form of mental illness at some point in our lives. This is why debunking what is actually true or not when it comes to mental health is crucial. Experiencing a mental health condition can be challenging, but it is also quite common.

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Why Are More Americans Dealing with Anxiety than Before?

Why Are More Americans Dealing with Anxiety than Before? Americans have a lot to worry about such as gun control, the economy, healthcare and so much more. Even though we have a lot to deal with, there are more and more Americans dealing with anxiety than before. Many people who have depression are also anxious, to the point of panic. Though we don't always put the two together, it's more common than you may think. We often think of depression as being down, having "the blues", or unable to enjoy life. But, those who suffer from depression can often also have significant episodes of anxiety.

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How To Support A Loved One with Depression

How To Support A Loved One with Depression We know it can be painful to watch someone you love suffering with depression. You don't have to let them suffer alone - we have some ways you can support a loved one with depression and help them through this difficult time. Depression is one of the most common mental illnesses in the United States, affecting some 16 million adults per year. As with other serious illnesses, it doesn't just affect those who have been diagnosed with it, either. Depression takes a toll on spouses, children, other family members, friends, and coworkers. We understand that it can be difficult to support a loved one with depression.

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Benzos or Passionflowers

Benzos or PassionflowersBy Dr. Dawn Bantel, Medical DirectorAnxiety is one of the most common issues that our residents struggle with here at Sabino Recovery. Many times the anxiety is so severe that it results in panic attacks. This is especially true for those with a history of trauma and struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). There are a number of medications that are used for the management and treatment of anxiety.

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What the Chef Knows

What the Chef Knows I have personally witnessed a big difference in the population here versus the last rehab center where I worked for 6 years. As the chef, I try to stay clear of getting into the personal stories of our residents, but I have noticed a massive shift in the narrative of the residents; It is a shift of view from “I have done bad things which I must not do in the future” to a viewpoint of accepting that they are still human beings that deserve to love themselves in spite of what they’ve been through. I have seen many desperate residents with low expectations from treatment because they’ve been in the treatment mill for so long transform before my eyes into the people they once were or want to become. I see the hope we give people for their future.

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